Posts for: January, 2014

By Kent S. Denton, D.D.S., P.A.
January 23, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
6FAQsAboutOrthodontics

Maybe you had braces as a child, or you are thinking of having your own (it's never too late) or your child's teeth straightened through orthodontia. But how much do you really know about this branch of dentistry? Here are six questions people often ask about orthodontia.

Q. How did the word “orthodontia” originate?
A. From Latin roots meaning “straight” and “teeth”

Q. Teeth are anchored in bone. How is it possible to move them?
A. Living bone is not unchanging. The bone, ligament, and the outer layer of a tooth's root (called cementum) react to the stresses of biting and chewing. Due to this stimulation the bone is constantly being resorbed (broken down) and rebuilt as it is pushed from one side of a tooth and pulled from the other. Under normal conditions, there is a balance resulting in a steady state. Orthodontia takes advantage of this process to slowly change the teeth's position in the desired way.

Q. My dentist talks about the periodontal ligament. What does this mean?
A. The ligament is a fibrous tissue that connects the teeth to their bone and takes part in the dynamic process of resorption and rebuilding of the bone.

Q. What kinds of conditions can orthodontia correct?
A. Treatment can improve the teeth's position and relations to each other (being too crowded or badly spaced) and the way the upper and lower jaws relate. It can enhance the appearance of a person's teeth and face, and can also improve the teeth's function in biting and chewing.

Q. What is the best first step to orthodontic treatment?
A. Talk to your general dentist about your concerns. If you are referred to an orthodontist, the next step is to assess your situation using molds of your teeth that show the way the upper and lower teeth meet (your bite). Special x-rays will be taken to show the locations of your teeth and relation of your upper and lower jaw. Your dental team may also use photographs of your smile and computer imaging to get a clear view of how your teeth are now and how they may be moved.

Q. What are some of the methods of treatment?
A. In the traditional method, small metal brackets are attached to the crowns of the teeth. Thin wires, called arch wires, are strung through attachments on the brackets. These wires are used to apply controlled force to direct the teeth in the desired direction. Another method is to use removable clear plastic aligners. A series of aligners is designed by a computer, to be changed from one to the next as the positions of the teeth slowly change.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about braces and orthodontia. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”


By Kent S. Denton, D.D.S., P.A.
January 08, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
AvoidingtheJimCarreyChipped-ToothLook

Fans of the classic bumbling-buddies comic film “Dumb and Dumber” will surely remember the chipped front tooth that Jim Carrey sported as simpleminded former limo driver Lloyd Christmas. Carrey reportedly came up with the idea for this look when considering ways to make his character appear more “deranged.” He didn't need help from the make-up department, however… He simply had his dentist remove the dental bonding material on his left front tooth to reveal the chip he sustained in grade school!

Creating a Bond
A dental cosmetic bonding involves application of a composite filling material that our office can color and shape to match the original tooth. Bonding material can be used to replace the lost portion of tooth or to seamlessly reattach the lost portion if it has been preserved and is otherwise undamaged. Little to no removal of existing tooth surface is needed. This is the quickest and lowest-cost option to repair a chip.

Alternatives
When a relatively large portion of the tooth is missing, a crown is often the better choice. It fully encases the visible portion of the remaining tooth above the gum line and is shaped and sized to match the original. It can be made of tooth-colored porcelain fused to metal crowns or all-ceramic (optimal for highly visible areas). A small amount of the existing tooth surface will be removed to allow the crown to fit over it.

A veneer can be used to hide smaller areas of missing tooth. This is a thin, custom-made shell placed on the front of the tooth to give it a new “face.” Some removal of existing tooth surface also may be necessary to fit a veneer.

A chipped tooth makes an impression, but generally not a flattering one. Nearly 20 years after “Dumb and Dumber” hit the theaters, the only thing Jim Carrey had to do recently to hint at a sequel for his nitwitted character was tweet a photo of that goofy grin!

If you would like more information about repairing a chipped tooth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth With Composite Resin.”